30 Days NoGluten/Sugar Challenge

Discussion in 'Nutrition and Supplements' started by StoicContemplation, Mar 20, 2021.

  1. StoicContemplation

    StoicContemplation Fapstronaut

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    I'm going to abstain from gluten for a while, starting from tomorrow.

    I guess that I should dedicate one paragraph to giving reasons why I'm doing this whilst trying to convince you doing the same, but I'll keep it short. Gluten can impede your intestines from absorbing the essential minerals and vitamins that are crucial for optimal testosterone - and thus energy - levels (gluten kind of 'sticks' to your intestines, gluten is responsible for that elastic structure of bread).

    On a more anecdotal note, when I eat bread, I tend to feel lethargic afterwards, craving a power nap. When I abstain from gluten and sugar for a while, I feel more energetic.

    I want to see what happens when I abstain from gluten for 30 days. It's going to be hard but this thread has the purpose of motivating me and keeping myself accountable.

    I'm also going to steer clear of products with refined sugar in it.
     
  2. So you're basically doing a Whole30, but keeping dairy, is that right :)
     
  3. StoicContemplation

    StoicContemplation Fapstronaut

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    Yesterday was supposed to be day 1 but I failed tremendously.

    There was bread in the house and the temptation was too appealing. Rationalizations took a hold on me, self-indulgence was the result.

    Tonight my family cooks spaghetti, I will see that as a closing treat before embarking a 30 day 'detox'.

    I abstained from alcohol, porn, coffee, cigarettes for some months now. Wasn't easy but I think this challenge is another level as the 'vice' aspect of eating bread/pasta isn't that acute as watching porn for example.

    I'm avoiding dairy at all cost. I could have named the thread 'Paleo for 30 days' but seemingly I have the biggest problem with gluten products (it's not unusual that I binge on bread when I have access to it). It forms the gateway to more mediocre quality food. If I consume bread, that will be associated with consuming dairy products like cheese.
     
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  4. Dude, you're a big inspiration. I really aspire to reach your level of discipline. I just quit smoking and I have a baby streak and wow, I wish I could go back to where you stand.

    All power to you, I am myself trying to abstain from dairy and following a keto diet so gluten is pretty much out of the question as well. I certainly understand what you're saying here, and I will be following the thread attentively, I am excited in advance to hear about your future success and I wish you the best in this endeavour!
     
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  5. StoicContemplation

    StoicContemplation Fapstronaut

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    Day 1:

    I made it through the first day. The psychological hurdle of day 1 is the highest because the willpower isn't established enough (i.e. no momentum). A previous marathon of self-indulgence makes it harder to get back on the horse. Indeed, this weekend I ate a lot of bread, cookies and chocolate. I came back to my home country on Friday, spoiling myself with some traditional snacks (a pastry dish) before leaving. Then a sandwich and a piece of cake in the airport. Another sandwich and a chocolate snack on the airplane. Then back in my country, a nation with a rich chocolate culture that mitigates the guilt of eating more chocolate than one should.

    So yeah it's interesting how I can be pretty disciplined for weeks about my diet, and then slip up and suck up the temporary comfort that gluten and sugary products bring about. Crossing the threshold of day 1 is important. Today I did have the urge to eat some bread and I felt a strong temptation when I was walking through the cookie section of the supermarket ("Get behind me Satan!").

    I made a soup (which is Godsent), the fiber was filling. The chicken broth I used "can contain traces of gluten" but I'm not going to seek insignificant grounds to give myself a hard time. Ate a lot of fruit... What else to say? It won't get necessarily easier the next days but once I get the momentum, it's just a matter of motivation and reminding myself of the existence of this thread and the reason why I started it.
     
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  6. StoicContemplation

    StoicContemplation Fapstronaut

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    Day 2-3

    Steered clear of gluten products. Luckily, Coca-Cola doesn't contain gluten, because I'm drinking liters of that. Technically this doesn't debark me from this healthy journey. Take that grain industry!

    Just kidding. I ate healthy. I made soups again. I ate a bunch of vegetables, some fish, olives, eggs... So yeah pretty paleolithic.

    It's not that I can talk much about 'benefits' yet. This stuff takes patience. This thread is a good tool to keep myself accountable. I had some urges for cookies or bread but ate a lot of fruit instead. I guess that a challenge like this makes you more aware about your eating pattern.
     
  7. StoicContemplation

    StoicContemplation Fapstronaut

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    Day 4:

    No gluten. I did experience some urges for something sweet but I bought grapes instead.
     
  8. StoicContemplation

    StoicContemplation Fapstronaut

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    Day 5:

    No gluten. Had some very strong urges today. I was in the supermarket and I passed the bread and cookie section. The feeling was comparable with a very strong PMO urge. Dopamine is actually released in anticipation of a certain pleasurable activity or when there is a certain trigger like walking through a certain section in a supermarket (just like a drug addict can get a strong urge for cocaine when he walks through a neighborhood where he usually buys his fix).

    I ate a lot of fruit again to suppress the urges. Some organic honey works too. Soup is a convenient and healthy way to make me feel full. It also gives me a boost in hydration.
     
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  9. StoicContemplation

    StoicContemplation Fapstronaut

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    Day 6:

    The cravings were colossal (apparently gluten binds to the same receptors as heroin or morphine does, hence that feeling of 'euphoria' when you're chewing on that bread) but I didn't give in (my brain was really trying to rationalize buying some cookies or something).

    I'm now replacing the comfort that bread brings about with the comfort of fruit. I'm eating a lot of fruit but I don't see the catch though, it doesn't make me lethargic/sluggish at all, unlike like bread/pasta/cookies. Eating a lot of fruit is also a temporary coping mechanism to mitigate the cravings.

    I had a steak with some potatoes in the evening.
     
  10. StoicContemplation

    StoicContemplation Fapstronaut

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    Day 7-8:

    Still on the wagon. I felt pretty good yesterday in terms of mood and energy.

    I see that my skin is looking a little bit better already. One could argue the causation vs. correlation as I upped my vegetable intake (eating a lot of home made soup with tomatoes, broccoli, etc.), but that's kind of inevitable when you go gluten free. The urges are less intense, or barely even there anymore.
     
  11. StoicContemplation

    StoicContemplation Fapstronaut

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    Day 9-11:

    Didn't touch any bread or the like. The cravings are less intense but today I did feel some strong impulses to indulge as there was bread, chocolate, etc. in the house.

    Through this elimination diet, I realize how much I can't eat of the foods that are very convenient. The flip side of the coin is that it's a bit easier when shopping in the supermarket because most of the isles have to fall under the radar.

    I have added a staple that I'm now eating everyday: sweet potatoes. It fills you up and it actually tastes good. I'm still consuming a lot of fruit.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2021
  12. MindfulWarrior

    MindfulWarrior Fapstronaut

    Hey man, did you manage to do it?

    I'm in! With a few other personal rules for myself:
    One meal a day (4-hour eating window), it worked well for me in the past.
    And extending to sugar, gluten, dairy, coffee!

    I want to do this for my health, I can't keep going like this using food as a drug, constantly seeking it to make me happy, going back and forth multiple times a day to eat something. Allthewhile it's impacting my health in so many different ways I can't imagine: my brain not working optimally, both in terms of performance (brainfog, OCD, etc.), and also in terms of using food for dopamine causing me to be less happy in general just like with PMO or any other addiction, depression, anxiety, etc. It's been so long since I have desired for a healthy way of life and I'm going to continue to want it, so how about now rather than waiting forever. I know unhealthy foods have nothing to offer me other than temporary pleasure, which I can get from healthier foods when my sensitization gets back up anyway. The problem is also about how down the spiral things go, how I can't have just a bit of it without it going out of control.

    I know the first week will be hard, especially tomorrow as my brain will be screaming for something to eat when I wake up, but I have to remember just make it through today and things will get much easier.

    Day 0
     
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  13. StoicContemplation

    StoicContemplation Fapstronaut

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    Well, it's sad to say that I relapsed around Easter (so pretty much after my last post in the beginning of April). I think I ate a pastry dish (just one I said to myself) but this opened the door to more cravings for sugar/gluten products... The cravings came back and I was back into the sugar cycle. For the past 2 months I basically have made the habit of indulging in cookies and regularly going to the bakery to buy some local pastries...

    I was actually thinking about this thread and the fact how it reminded me how hard quitting sugar is (it's more addictive than cocaine apparently).

    Now I'm currently on day 3 of Sugar/GlutenFree (yes, it's tough). So thank you for the reminder. We can suffer together by quitting this poison. I'm not going to post a detailed journal as I'm currently busy with exams but I can pop in from time to time to say if I'm still on the wagon.

    Good luck!

    Day 3
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2021
  14. MindfulWarrior

    MindfulWarrior Fapstronaut

    That's always how it happens isn't it? Just like any addiction, one little bit won't ever do it, next thing you know you're back to square one.
    Good luck to you too!
     
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  15. L00k

    L00k Fapstronaut

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    Consuming gluten-sugar is no doubt a vicious cycle that creates never ending problems.
    Kicking this habit is one of the best decisions we can make. Great to see you have realized this!

    Chronic inflammation among other things. Many slowshowing indicators like simple injuries don't heal as fast as they used to.
    These two bad boys also drain us of vital vitamins and minerals. So even if one is eating healthy otherwise - the gluten-sugar-combo unfortunately will override this.

    Since you already have embarked on this journey - I highly recommend looking into your eating-fasting intervals. If you can get a 16-20 hour fasting break daily it will help tremendously. However the transition period will require some patience. In plain english: It might not feel good at all the first week or so. This is a critical phase where a lot of people jump back to old habits - the comfort-zone of comfort-foods i.e. "short term rewards - long term damage".
    So you might want to choose a period when you know you are not overwhelmed with external obligations before you start.

    Good luck bud!
     
  16. MindfulWarrior

    MindfulWarrior Fapstronaut

    @L00k
    Absolutely agree with everything you've mentioned, among so many other downsides health-wise.

    I did mention I was going for daily 20-hour water fasting as well, I've experience quite a lot with fasting in the past, even long term, it's the fastest way to get back to homeostasis no doubt, it also makes daily planning easier.

    The first week is indeed the trickiest but I see it in a good way as it motivates me to keep pushing knowing that once my routine settles things get much easier, especially the first 2, 3 days.

    Thanks for the kind words!
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2021
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  17. MindfulWarrior

    MindfulWarrior Fapstronaut

    Day 1

    Made it! This morning as expected I craved something but I remembered that I just have to hang tight today and it should be the worst day.
    I fasted, drank two green teas during the day to not have my brain go crazy without caffeine, then broke my fast at 7pm (20 hours) with soup, rice, steak and oatmeal for desert, then herbal tea.

    Tomorrow should be smoother than today, but challenging nonetheless. I can't wait to see the many ways in which it's going to improve my well-being if I make it.
    Started fasting at 10:20pm.
     
  18. MindfulWarrior

    MindfulWarrior Fapstronaut

    Day 2

    Waking up was a challenge, I actually feel pretty bad when I wake up and I use food as a sort of a motivation, compensation of some sort, so not having food is a bit harsh. Hopefully it gets better, provided it is due to coffee or poor diet so that I can wake up effortlessly just like when I was a kid.

    Had one green tea, a matcha, and one herbal tea during the day, still, I got a headache by the end of the day. I don't know if it's coffee or just withdrawal symptoms from all the things I stopped eating but it went away with eating. I fasted until 8pm (21h40mn), ate a lot of home-made french fries with three fried eggs then two bananas with peanut butter for desert, and finished the day with one herbal tea, started fasting at 11:25pm.

    I don't want to quit this time and have to wait for a while before I have the energy to start it all over again and possibly doing that cycle forever.
    Good luck @StoicContemplation!
     
  19. StoicContemplation

    StoicContemplation Fapstronaut

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    Good posts ^

    Day 4-5

    Currently on day 5. Yesterday (today also) was weird: I had insane cravings but they were more physicial than psychological in nature. What I mean by that is that I don't really have the desire to indulge in comfort food as such, but I am experiencing a pretty considerable amount of suffering. I feel like there is some sort of emptiness that my body is craving to fulfill (maybe it's the gut bacteria that are sending signals or something).

    I'm drinking tons of water. It just feels like the right thing to do, as a way to help cleanse the system so to speak. Since yesterday, I'm smelling a certain odor that is coming from my pores (sweating has also increased). Apparently that's normal during a detox, the toxins are leaving the body (I also experienced this when I quit alcohol). A good sign.

    I had an exam today and I really was thinking if this is the right time to quit sugar (headaches, couldn't really concentrate yesterday, the exam went fine luckily). But on the other hand, a daily routine of snacking isn't necessarily conducive to an elavated level of (sustainable) energy and concentration. If I eat bread/cookies, I will need a nap because of the insulin crash. Although I'm still in the first stage of Sugar/GlutenFree, i.e. withdrawal symptoms, suboptimal energy, etc., I already don't have these crashes anymore.

    So your brain may fool you that getting that sugar fix will get rid off the suffering. Truth of the matter is, that when you're on sugar, you're actually suffering, but you're just anesthetizing the suffering with the very subtance that draws you from your vital energy in the first place. A vicious cycle that is hard to break indeed. When you quit sugar, the suffering that was already there suddenly becomes more clear because you cease to numb the suffering (the chickens are coming home to roost so to speak). So quitting sugar is hard to endure, but it's really allowing the reality of your current state to manifest itself in its purest form.

    Although I have tried Paleo multiple times, I always slipped back. Sometimes I would 'survive' the suffering phase and reach like 10 days but then I would become complicit and forget the very reason why I started. I think I have had a shift of headspace for the last couple of days. Something clicked. I have always consumed too much sugar and I have a habit to over-indulge. It explains some things.

    It also occured to me that there is a strong link between a PMO relapse and snacking. If I eat sugar/gluten products, I feel lethargic, I rest in bed. My discipline fades away and I will scrolling Twitter/Reddit. Next thing I know I'm seeking for something NSFW. Although not every instance where I snacked has led to a PMO lapse, I can say with confidence however that every PMO lapse stemmed from a lethargic state because of sugar. That I didn't realize this earlier!

    Because of the exam, I also did intermittent fasting. My first meal was around 3-4 pm. I made a salad/mix of trout fillet, boiled eggs, a tomato and chickpeas (adding olive oil on top). This decent fat-protein-carb combo stabilizes the insulin in the blood and reduced the cravings. Had some blueberries and a teaspoon of organic honey and did some hill sprints. I think that IF/OMAD does enhance the process of detoxification @MindfulWarrior, smart move (albeit not the path of the least resistance)! Since I'm having exams, I will not be too preoccupied with adding the dimension of time intervals to the challenge, but I see its merits for sure (increased fat burning, boosting testosterone/growth hormones).

    By the way, a good way to deal with cravings is drinking sparkling water (if you're not dry fasting at least). I personally add some fresh lemon juice (citrus is good against cravings). Cheers.
     
  20. MindfulWarrior

    MindfulWarrior Fapstronaut

    This! Same pattern as every addiction.
    I think you're right with the last part too, it's only when we stop suppressing whatever is going on that we have a chance to move past it.
    Indeed there are many health benefits to fasting. But what I love the most is being organized with my food consumption. If I eat during the day I get hungry multiple times a day, and I don't like having to go back and forth deciding what to eat, making myself something to eat etc. With OMAD I am not bothered with hunger during the day and can just focus on my day, and then I'm actually hungry and motivated to cook myself something good for dinner.

    I do love lemon water, but I only have tea and water while fasting. I don't dry fast, I wouldn't recommend dry-fasting everyday, it's taxing on the body, but probably good once in a while. I will try sparkling water whenever I go shopping and see how that goes.

    Day 3

    Did it! Had teas during the day and broke my fast at 7:30pm (20hours) with home-made french fries (again!) and beef tongue, for desert had 2 bananas and peanut butter again.
    Everyday it's actually down to going past waking up, once I make my tea and settle down I'm good and I have no problem during the day, no cravings etc. I realise I'm not actually hungry during the day, it's just that the food we eat are so stimulating that we get tempted even though we wouldn't desire natural foods. Then at the end of the day I start getting hungry, I think about what I'm going to have for dinner and I'm excited about it. I think my body is starting to get acclimated as it was not challenging today besides waking up.
    Started fasting at 11pm.
     
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