30 Minutes Of Exercise Not Enough For A Healthy Heart

Discussion in 'Self Improvement' started by Congrelous, Oct 8, 2015.

  1. Congrelous

    Congrelous Fapstronaut

    583
    327
    63
    For older people I can definitely see that. The damage is more progressed, more potential to exacerbate an existing condition.

    But, again, you can't not publish your findings because it might distress people. You literally can't, too much work and grant money on the line.
     
    Isvara likes this.
  2. Isvara

    Isvara Fapstronaut

    21
    29
    13
    Also true, but you can frame it differently. Most of how people walk through the world is by looking at the way it is framed. Even a lot of what we do here is framing. Framing can be the difference between someone tossing in the towel and getting up to make their life better
     
  3. Congrelous

    Congrelous Fapstronaut

    583
    327
    63
    The reverse could be argued. If the language were framed in a softer kind of language, people would not have as much urgency to exercise and thus more cases of heart disease would occur. Everything is a trade off.

    If we're looking at a preventative model of treating heart disease in a given population, it is probably better to get them while they're young as opposed to it being too late.
     
  4. swimbikerun

    swimbikerun Fapstronaut

    245
    119
    43
    These knee problems that arose in your friends could have been caused by any number of risk factors for osteoarthritis, including age and obesity. You said they were "in track." Does that mean they continued running for their entire lives? Because you do see runners in their 50s and 60s running marathons. These people aren't exactly a minority, either. Function determines structure. If you run track in high school and then sit at a desk job for 40 years, your knees are not going to retain that same degree of flexibility, strength, etc. In any event cartilaginous remodeling is a documented process. Do you need adequate recovery time? Absolutely, any coach will tell you that. You are quick to connect exercise with damaged knees, which is not supported by the evidence and doesn't fit existing biological models.

    Not everybody has their CRP or hormone levels checked or goes for an ECG because those levels alone are not indicative of having heart disease or anything else. All CRP does is measure inflammation, nothing else. If you are overweight/obese, you are going to have a high CRP. Depending on the test, it can also be expensive and time-consuming. In comparison, taking a blood pressure is cheap and takes all of a minute. You have to also consider the possibility of FALSE POSITIVES. For example, it is estimated that a large percentage of the population has spinal disc abnormalities of one sort of another, but are asymptomatic. You don't send everybody for an MRI of the back in the absence of symptoms "just because." You don't cut them open to "fix" a "problem." In fact, the US Preventative Services Task Force has recently recommended limiting mammography with the understanding that a lot of breast "cancers" may not be harmful in the long run. What a good clinician does is take laboratory values in conjunction with family history and other variables to decide what testing is warranted and what will be useless. This is all to minimize risk maximize reward. But there are always drawbacks, no free lunch.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2015
  5. Congrelous

    Congrelous Fapstronaut

    583
    327
    63
    You like to argue. You must have an axe to grind in your mind somewhere. Everything you said is a correct way to think about it. My only rule is skepticism for anything.
     
  6. swimbikerun

    swimbikerun Fapstronaut

    245
    119
    43
    Heart cells do reproduce, but at extremely slow rates. The majority of "strengthening" you're seeing with cardiac tissue is hypertrophy and improvements in efficiency (of the good sort). In skeletal muscle, it's hypertrophy (increases in size rather than number). Cardiac cancer is extremely, extremely rare. Rates of cancer with primary tumor in skeletal muscle are also rare. What you're seeing with the leading causes of death are heart disease, cancer (and then again, cancers of prostate, colon, breast, lung, uterus, and rectum are most common), stroke, kidney disease, chronic lower respiratory disease, Alzheimer's and diabetes.

    Exercise is protective against almost all of the above. Note that the study doesn't say that 30 minutes is a bad thing, obviously it is better than nothing. What it may be saying is that it is inadequate to minimize the risk of heart failure.
     

Share This Page