Intermittent Fasting side effects

Discussion in 'Self Improvement' started by eggcelent777, Nov 9, 2021.

  1. eggcelent777

    eggcelent777 Fapstronaut

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    Have you guys tried fasting before? if so, have you experienced the following side effects? or is it just me:
    -constant stomachache
    -headache
    -when I press my belly area, it feels weird
    -bloated

    it is really concerning, and I'm under 18, is it safe?
     
  2. E31

    E31 Fapstronaut

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    Are these symptoms only occuring in your fasted state and only since you've started intermittend fasting?
    What are your time windows and do you still eat and especially drink enough?
    In general it is safe, but there is some factors to consider.
    So if it only occurs during the fasting and then quickly goes away as soon as you start eating you might wanna change up what you eat and when and for how long and experiment with that. But also you should listen to your body and if its not for you thats totally fine.

    In any way this is no medical advice, so if these effects are lasting please consult a doctor.

    Lil tip:
    A glass of water in the morning with a teaspoon of salt helps me a bit with occasional headaches and cognitive awarenes during the fasting period.
     
  3. Coolbreeze

    Coolbreeze Fapstronaut

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    From personal experience I can say the most notable side effects are not being able to push 100% during workouts, but also occasional headaches indeed. All of the other aspects you mentioned I have not experienced.
     
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  4. eggcelent777

    eggcelent777 Fapstronaut

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    Thank you for your reply, my time window is 16 hours fasting-8 hours eating time. Every time I break my fast/eat food, there are always scorching feelings in my stomach area and the other side effects I mentioned above. I'm new and if it is safe, I guess it will heal by itself over time. And yes, I drink water occasionally and especially black tea.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2021
  5. E31

    E31 Fapstronaut

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    It might help to "ease in" with a shorter fasting period. Maybe start out with 12 and add an hour per week. I personally feel pretty good with 14-15 hours.
    And also try not to immediately break the fast with a huge meal but rather drink some broth or eat a banana, something easy on the stomach first so your body has time to get the digestion going.
     
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  6. I've IFed at the very least 16:8 for over a year straight. Never had any side effects, this is odd. Might be what you break your fast with? Something you might be intolerant to?
     
  7. eggcelent777

    eggcelent777 Fapstronaut

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    hmm... I don't think I have any kind of food intolerance. but for the past few days, the symptoms have weakened. By the way, have there any distinguished benefits of fasting for a year straight? have you lost weight, been more focused, etc? if so, would you mind sharing it with me and everyone here?
     
  8. If when you are fasting you find yourself thinking of and desiring food, your stomach will produce acid in preparation for it. If no food comes, the acid can damage the lining of the stomach as it has nothing else with which to react. The result is what doctors will call a peptic ulcer.

    If your fasting is such that it is regular and predictable, your body should get into a rhythm with it and not make stomach acid at the wrong times. But when the fasting is at irregular intervals, the chances for an ulcer are increased.

    If you believe you have an ulcer, the solution is to eat regular meals, at regular times, every day, without skipping any--and keep this up until the stomach has healed. Depending on the severity of the ulcer, this can take some time--typically at least six weeks. So, for health reasons, you may wish to cease fasting for a period of time until your stomach has healed. Meanwhile, it is important to eat at regular times, and not to confuse the stomach with between-meal snacks.

    There is no magic pill to cure an ulcer. An antacid can bring temporary relief, but it does the opposite of what is needed for digestion. Acids are required to break down proteins in food. Therefore, the doctors would give very similar advice to what I have just given if they think your stomachache is that of an ulcer.

    If it is an ulcer, your stomach will hurt most just before a meal, and will feel somewhat better after eating. If this is not the case, or you feel the stomachache may be related to some other condition, you may wish to consult your physician.

    Hope this helps.
     
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  9. Robinthehood

    Robinthehood Fapstronaut

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