List of best things to do instead of meditation...

Discussion in 'Self Improvement' started by TantusJulius, Nov 26, 2019.

  1. TantusJulius

    TantusJulius Fapstronaut

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    I will list activities that I found work best for me against withdrawal symptoms, and help my nervous system to recalibrate, so i do not have to rewrite these in seperated posts for people.



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    My goal to offer valuable activities, and tecniques to anyone who whish to help their recovery, without meditation. I will mainly list activities that you can do while sitting.


    1. Reading aloud.

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    Pros:
    • if you use this forum, I got a feeling you know how to read already, do not need to learn anything extra to do that
    • stimulates those brain parts that tend to be "weak" in addictions
    • calms you down, meanwhile same time teach you how to focus
    • you can read aloud for other people, can be social activity
    • you can learn many things by reading, or read enjoyable stories
    • may help you fall in sleep faster when insomnia chasing you
    Cons:
    • May cause neck, or eye strain

    Studies/sources:
    Reading aloud and arithmetic calculation improve frontal function of people with dementia.


    Cortical activation during reading aloud of long sentences: fMRI study

    Reading Aloud Is Good for the Brain


    2.Doing jigsaw puzzles

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    Pros:

    • one of best brain exercise in my experience:

    "Based on a cognitive task analysis, jigsaw puzzling may demand multiple cognitive abilities including visual perception (e.g., recognizing objects, patterns, and orientation of lines), constructional praxis (e.g., integrating visual and motor information to assemble pieces), mental rotation (e.g., mentally rotating piece’s orientation to fit them to other pieces), cognitive speed and visual scanning (e.g., sorting puzzle pieces), cognitive flexibility (e.g., switching attention between different strategies, between different puzzle pieces, and between puzzle shape, image, and color), perceptual reasoning (e.g., integrating different perceptual information to develop strategies and plans how to solve the puzzle), and working and episodic memory (e.g., keeping the association between spatial location and visual patterns/images of puzzle pieces in working memory and long-term memory)."
    • they cheap enough, and takes days to put together one
    • you can play together with friends, family members
    • you can decorate your rooms with them
    • will exercise your mind, and same time helps to calm down
    Cons:
    • you can loose track of time while doing them, can be addictive too
    Sources:

    Six surprising health benefits of doing jigsaw

    Jigsaw Puzzling Taps Multiple Cognitive Abilities and Is a Potential Protective Factor for Cognitive Aging


    3.Sudoku, crosswords:

    Pros:

    Cons:
    (Updates soon.)
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2019 at 12:22 PM
  2. Son of Midgaard

    Son of Midgaard Fapstronaut

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    I've been trying to use meditation for calm and inner peace for about 1 and a half years. What is the cost benefit analysis you provide on this phenomenon?
     
  3. Hold it in

    Hold it in Fapstronaut

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    I try and keep myself busy by collecting things
     
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  4. TantusJulius

    TantusJulius Fapstronaut

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    Lets see, 1 and half years is = 548 days, but probably you were not meditating on all days, you maybe meditated 4 days of a week, for 30 minutes. Thats 313 days with 30 minutes meditation, so you meditated 157 hours in last 1,5 years. According to this site it takes 600 hours to learn a category 1 language for a English speaker. That is ~1/4 of a foreign language in that time.
    http://www.openculture.com/2017/11/...oreign-languages-from-easiest-to-hardest.html

    Only you can tell if meditation worked for you, do you feel calm and inner peace on most days, or only when meditating, what happens if you stop meditating etc...
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2019
  5. Nicko Stretch

    Nicko Stretch Fapstronaut

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    I don't meditate, but I do try to spend a few minutes everyday focusing my attention on specific things. Some small some large, but by increasing my ability to focus my attention, I am able to observe unwanted or unhelpful thoughts often as they appear. So much evidence out there supporting this technique.
    I don't recommend meditation as a means to avoid uncomfortable feelings though.
     
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  6. MyPhantom

    MyPhantom Fapstronaut

    Why no meditation? There's research that proves how much positive effects it has on you
     
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  7. Finalito

    Finalito Fapstronaut

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    Hey @TantusJulius many thanks for your post. I really like it and had a lot of fun reading through your pros and cons lists. However, only two items on the list. What a pity. I hope you'll let us know if you find any more items.
    Also, I wouldn't title it "instead of" but rather "as well as" :) But none of my business. Meditation works for me and I'm happy with that, but I will definitely give your suggestions a try :)
     
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  8. Nicko Stretch

    Nicko Stretch Fapstronaut

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    Steven Hayes, who is one of the top clinical psychologists in the world at the moment who co developed acceptance and commitment therapy has something to say on the matter. His team conducted hundreds of studies into the effectiveness of mindfulness based meditation. The evidence supported the theory that it is helps people develop their ability to focus attention, and if you can focus attention you are able to look at the thoughts feelings and beliefs which are causing you to behave in a way which you would like to change, and can support you in not reacting to thoughts and feelings in an unhelpful way.
    He does warn against using mindfulness as an avoidance technique, for example "I can't talk now I need to go meditate!". Or using it to try to avoid uncomfortable feelings, for example " I really want to PMO now, I better go meditate". The evidence does not support that mindfulness is effective in this way.
     
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  9. Minsc

    Minsc Fapstronaut

    In my understanding of mindfulness it can not be used as a form of avoidance as the whole point of mindfulness seems to be to become aware of ones thoughts. From what I've read, it is purposely bringing attention to specific thoughts with out judgement. While it may benefit by displacing certain thoughts, the who point is not to to actively displace. Mindfulness sounds like the perfect tool to bring attention to the thoughts we want to avoid and learn to accept, deal with and move on from them.
     
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