which is the best fighting sport for street fight?

Discussion in 'Off-topic Discussion' started by u376, May 24, 2018.

  1. u376

    u376 Fapstronaut

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    Maine usko pichle 4 saal se subscribe kar rakha hai
     
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  2. u376

    u376 Fapstronaut

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    Haan.... natural abilities hai usme
    Vaise favorite wrestler undertaker hai....bahut memories Judi hai
     
  3. yrr toh tagdaa fann haii shii maij boxing kaa mann gya maii ajj tera thread deghaa thaa maine mike tyson vs brock wala tabhii ptaa lagg gya tha kii tera interst hai boxing wagera mai:)
     
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  4. u376

    u376 Fapstronaut

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    Haha bahut purana thread tha
     
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  5. JustinX

    JustinX Fapstronaut

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    You see only using boxing on street when it is done by somebody who never learnt how to fight before.

    Disadvantage of doing just boxing is that you are taught to use and also defend only against boxing. However in a real fight with skilled fighters there will be elbows, knees, and kicks. All of those 3 are powerful if you know how and when to use them and also when not to. For this reason I see kickboxing or Muay Thay as better alternative.

    For a street fight and defense I would NOT recommend brazilian jiu jitsu or normal jiu jitsu, because it is close fighting usually 1on1 and on the street you should always keep the distance and never get close due to knives or other weapons that could suprices you and kill you in instant if you are gripping each other.

    I have done Muay Thay for about year or two and it learnt me a lot how to fight. First, knees, elbows, kicks, speed, endurance. Overall great and recommended for fighting however it is still not much helpful if opponent uses some weapon.

    Recently I started Krav Maga, and I have to say that for street fight it is a best. Other martial arts they are teaching it as a sport, so they dont teach you (at least not in a first several years) how to defend against knives, poles, brass knuckles. In Krav Maga they do and that was the main reason why I started it, plus they teach you how to use fists, elbows, knees, kick to deliver most damage in the shortest time, they teach you how to fight more opponents at the same time, how to be aware of the situation and threats and how to deal with them. For those reasons in my humble opinion and from experience best for street fightings.
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2018
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  6. u376

    u376 Fapstronaut

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    Yes Muay Thai also teaches in clinch situations
    Wow....krav maga is also very good.....
    Krav maga is also used in armies I think.....
    Wow....I think no one will dare to mess with you.....haha
    Self defense is a must in today's world.....
    Yes there are several YouTube channels which teach krav maga
    But learning it from an institute like you did.....is more practical and beneficial
    Thanks
     
  7. I've studied all types of martial arts but none of them were complete and usable right out of the box in terms of street fighting. All martial arts classes provide you with tools but in my experience, they don't teach you how to apply the tools in a practical effective manner. MMA techniques can be adapted for all types of combat but most of these classes are taught by straight up sportsman who never applied these techniques in combat or never made combat applications their focus at any point.

    I keep it on the feet if possible but BJJ does have usefullness if things go to the ground. Most of the people I've trained with have never rolled on, grass, sand, tile, concrete or asphault. The physics are different for each surface and will change your whole game tremendously. You try to pull an arm back or do certain sweeps your risk shattering your arm or busting your cerebral cortex. Sand and grass gives and makes it impossible to shrimp. Shriming on asphault will scrape the top 2 layers of skin off your back. If you try to use BJJ for self defense without practicing on real surfaces that shit will fail in real life.

    Boxing and Muay Thai are more suitable but they are still ring sports that dont address multiple attackers and weapons. Niether my Muay Thai or boxing coaches taught me how to hit someone when my hands are unwrapped with no glove. You can sock the shit out of Andre the Giant when youre wearing wrapps and 16s. If you hit someone bare knuckle and you land improperly, youll shatter your hands.

    I know people who have been studying MMA and traditional for years and these points have never even crossed their minds. Its good to go in and get some basic techniques but dont be drinking the koolaid.

    I don't like the Krav Maga attack technique but they do keep things relatively simple and focus on self defense and strategy so if I had to advise someone to study one martial art, it may be Krav Maga.
     
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  8. u376

    u376 Fapstronaut

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    I think some people are naturally good in street fights..... others train hard to get better
    I have been hearing praise about krav maga...
    It's basically a combat used in armies
     
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  9. Nah, it's all training and practice. The guys who are good at street fighting with no formal training are guys who fought alot. If you spend enough time fighting and figure out what works and what doesnt you can get really good. I don't like Krav Maga's technique set but they do a shit load of sparring and focus on vital points. I don't feel Muay Thai and BJJ are all that technically superior to the Karate, Kung Fu and JKD's.

    In Muay Thain and BJJ, you spar from day one. The Karates and Kunk Fu styles are technically sound but the guys who do them usually get beat in competitons and street fights because many McDojo senseis dont let their students spar nearly enough to get comfortable enough to perform well in fights.
     
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  10. primaljade

    primaljade Fapstronaut

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    In Krav Maga I know of a woman who fought someone off her by breaking his ankle. In BJJ, one of the students stopped a known "choke-out" attacker in my city.

    I don't think it matters too much whether it's boxing, BJJ, muay thai, etc. Each style has advantages and disadvantages. As long as you get decent amount of experience at sparring, your ability to defend yourself is way higher than most people.
     
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  11. Boxing is good if your learning to spar and defend, though learn how to kick and defend against it, because in a real fight few expect it and gets the opponent down quick
     
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  12. u376

    u376 Fapstronaut

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    Yes either it's training or street fight experience
     
  13. u376

    u376 Fapstronaut

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  14. u376

    u376 Fapstronaut

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    Boxing ends the fight quickly
     
  15. zeroeight

    zeroeight Fapstronaut

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    Boxing is great if you're on your feet but a lot of street/bar fights are pretty wild and can end up grappling or on the ground. Muay Thai will allow you to maintain distance with kicks, bjj will give you a huge advantage if it does go to the ground. Best idea would be to avoid fights, second best would be some MMA training I would imagine. I have no experience with Krav Maga but always wanted to try it out.
     
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  16. hashalot

    hashalot Fapstronaut

    Muay Thay (Muay Thai?) and BJJ complement boxing really well. Boxing will get you good hands, Muay Thai will get you deadly kicks, elbows, knees, and clenches, then BJJ takes care of the grappling.

    One thing posted above that I think needs to be emphasized is that Muay Thai, when trained regularly, will get your legs so tough you'll be able to stop a fight with one or only a handful of leg kicks. The difference between Muay Thai and other martial arts is the emphasis on leg kicks. One or two well placed leg kicks and you can totally disable an attacker for weeks or months.

    In training, I once broke a boxer's elbow with a Muay Thai kick. We were sparring, it was an accident, and I'm not proud of it. But, for the sake of an example, he had years of competitive boxing experience on me and wanted to spar MMA. He kept absorbing my kicks so I placed one at half strength for the rips to wake him up and he caught it with his elbow.

    I haven't formally trained in years but I still get my basic Muay Thai kicks in on a heavy bag a few times a week to maintain that leg toughness. If they don't have weapons, their thighs are gonna take a beating, if they get close they'll eat elbows and get thrown.

    If they have a knife, run. Don't try to disarm them.
     
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  17. primaljade

    primaljade Fapstronaut

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    I say check them all out, and whenever you like a particular style, go with that one! It'll just make it easier to motivate yourself to train and stick with it.
     
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  18. Krav Maga: when its not watered down its great! I did it two years and a half. Since the second day each time at least 3 sparrings; plus stress drills. Downsides: you need to go often there, cause although it is simple it wants to prepare you for a lot of different things. Something you wont master when you do krav once the week one hour long... other downside: there are still techniques in it that are more on the irrealistic side, no matter how much they tell you that the street is all that counts.

    BJJ: i train it right now. The style all have an opinion about but no one knows. NO - it isnt simply "roll no matter what!...." and even as a Fan of grappling i wouldnt necessarly search the ground. But often you cant avoid it. besides most people think of self-situation with a box-fight like pic in their head. But the girl that watches video with its buddy that becomes "touchy" on the sofa is in a self-defense-situation too...

    Boxing: from everything i did the style that prepares you the fastest: why? because it is limited. That is as well its downside. But if you only wanna beat an average Joe a year of boxing should be allready enough.

    Kickboxing: more or less the same - but most kicks wont work in Jeans; no one will attack you like this etc. But then again: maybe you can apply em? maybe you get in fight in summer in shorts etc?

    Wing Tsun: overtheoretical, artificial crap. No one fights like that. There is a reason one doesnt find any video where it is clearly visible applied on the streets or in the ring.

    My impression is that in the sport styles you find more "bad-ass" people to train with. The technically niveau is higher. I did boxing and kickboxing during my krav days and usualy in krav those have been good that did cross-training too, or came from another combat-sport. The sportive approach itself will make you allready a better athelte: and being sportive is something that will help you a lot!

    From the styles i never trained combat sambo looks like something that is really a good preparation for a fight.
     
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  19. u376

    u376 Fapstronaut

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    Now after reading all the suggestions
    I think combination of krav maga and boxing would be the best
    Thanks for your reply
     
  20. Its a combination that makes you realyl fast a fighter (assuming the school is good, look for "aliveness" in martial arts on youtube). You will lack grappling skills - depending on the background of your krav teacher. But, well, step by step ;-)
     
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