Would 20 minutes a day or for 4 days a week, on the treadmill reduce stress significantly?

Discussion in 'Self Improvement' started by Anonymous86, Dec 14, 2019.

  1. Anonymous86

    Anonymous86 Fapstronaut

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    It seems like a no-brainer, I am legit curious. I don't know whether or not it'll be the best exercise for me whose an out of shape beginner.
     
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  2. LokiReformed

    LokiReformed Fapstronaut

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    Any regular exercise should help with your stress, but the important part is going to be making the habit of getting on the treadmill (or going on a walk outside) both enjoyable and accessible. I know it's not always a possibility, but for me being outdoors reduces my stress way more than any indoor equipment. By accessible -- I mean -- make sure you plan away any obstacles (*I've got my shoes, *I've set aside the time, etc.)

    At worst, it's something that doesn't really fit you. But I think it's a great idea.
     
  3. Anonymous86

    Anonymous86 Fapstronaut

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    I think that it's a great idea as well. I just need to plan it out. Exercise is important and without it, the body suffers. I think that bringing music would help me too, to be a bit of a little thing to look forward to while exercising.
     
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  4. Espi1971

    Espi1971 Fapstronaut

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    Sounds like a great plan @Anonymous86! I also like your idea of listening to music while on the treadmill.
     
  5. Jogging is great for stress reduction and overall mood alteration. I haven't been running continually for at least 10 years but I took it up again this summer, probably 2-3 times a week in average for about three months. I experienced imediate stress relief after every session, and it lasted at least a day. I was running 5K outdoors in about 30min.

    The weather has unfortunately been particularily bad here for a while now, and the ground is covered with soggy leaves providing no traction so I haven't been able to run. Should try the threadmill too.
     
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  6. fredisthebes

    fredisthebes Fapstronaut

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    I agree that outside exercise is best, especially when it comes to the stress relieving benefits. But it's hard in the winter, when the weather is bad and it takes a hell of a lot of self discipline to get out in the dark and cold after (or even before) a hard day at work.

    Try the treadmill for a week or two and see how you feel.
     
  7. Anonymous86

    Anonymous86 Fapstronaut

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    I just got back from the gym today for the first time in a long time. I did the treadmill for 15 minutes and ran on it for half speed with no incline...and I gotta say, I was winded and tired at the end of the session. I couldn't do a second leg workout like I had planned because my chest was while not hurting, felt a little sore after the treadmill and my legs felt tired.

    Do you think I stopped appropriately? Did I start working out doing too much? What workout goals should I work on next? I don't see it as a failure, I actually got into the gym for a good workout for the first time, in a long time.
     
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  8. First of all congratulations for creating this thread AND following through and actually goinf to the gym.

    Since you're just beginning you did very well to not push yourself to much. The goal is to be consistent, not blast yourself on day 1 :D

    Whenever someone stops going to the gym for a long period of time, they must recondition themselves slowly before getting serious, because the injury risk is high.

    This conditioning or reconditioning can be achieved through cardio (like you did) and or very light-weight weight lifting.

    You will probably have sore muscles for the enxt couple days (could last up to a week). Listen to your body and don't push yourself too hard in the beginning: your muscles and lungs are weaking up from hibernation. Let the soreness pass before the next session and drink plenty of water.

    If you remain consistent with your sessions, you'll have less and less muscle soreness. In a few weeks (3-4) you'll be able to go 4-5 times a week and have longer or more intense sessions.

    Then in terms of training, what did you have in mind: cardio? Or weight-lifting? Or both maybe? Do you have prior experience?
     
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  9. Anonymous86

    Anonymous86 Fapstronaut

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    Thank you so much for this! I have both cardio and weight-lifting in mind. I procrastinated on doing the gym for so long because I'm super shy and hate being judged. But I know that this is the right thing for me right now.

    I do feel a bit sore and all I did was run on a treadmill for 15 minutes! Crazy how out of shape I am.
     
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  10. Espi1971

    Espi1971 Fapstronaut

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    Sounds like a very good introductory workout to me, and I think it was wise on your part to stop the workout and give your lungs and body a rest.

    I'm not sure what you should do next. Everybody has their own routine. I encourage you to experiment and do whatever you like...whatever keeps you training.

    I encourage you to use the Internet and customize your own research efforts toward fitness and nutrition.

    I like going to the gym and starting with pushups followed by weights followed by 30 minutes on the Stairmaster then ending with more pushups. Each workout day on the weights I target a different body region: legs, back, chest, shoulders.

    I also like riding my mountainbike because in my opinion nothing beats training via nature and fresh air.

    Keep up the good work!

     
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  11. Don't worry about being judged or being shy. I've been going to the gym for 7 years. I've never seen anyone make fun of newbies. Usually people are happy to help. If you have a question, don't hesitate to ask the staff or someone around. People are usually happy to help.
     
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  12. Angus McGyver

    Angus McGyver Fapstronaut

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    Any kind of physical exercise you implement to your daily routine will have large benefits on your physical-, mental and spiritual health as well as your overall life-quality (unless you're already exercising intensely). But, instead of walking on a treadmill, I would recommend going for a walk outside without having anything plugged into your ears as that background-noise will interfere with your senses.
    Just be fully present in the current moment and pay attention to all sounds, smells, and whatever animal-life that gets into your periphery. If it's too chilly outside for you to build up a little pulse and sweat, just put on an extra layer of clothing. Start with 20 minutes a day (if you don't feel more fit at the moment), then increase the pace steadily for a few weeks until you can extend the walks to 30 minutes. Then, when you feel that losing those a few kilos have made the burden lighter on your legs and knees, set the bar higher and shoot for jogging those entire 30 minutes, and so on and so on.

    Then, as you get in better shape and don't get hurt (if that's the case, cycling and swimming are great alternatives for cardio-training) your long term-goal could then be to finish a 1/2 marathon or similar. Try to do as many of these runs/walks as you can as without having any headphones plugged in since that makes you focus on the task itself, being present in the moment, activating/stimulating your creativity and thicken your frontal bone as well.

    Best of luck in your endeavors!
     
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  13. Anonymous86

    Anonymous86 Fapstronaut

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    Exactly. It’s like a mindfulness exercise. I appreciate this post.
     
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  14. Angus McGyver

    Angus McGyver Fapstronaut

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    So many people these days seem to need some kind of external stimulation all the freaking time and hence never get the chance to sit down alone in silence, observing their own thoughts, perspectives and impressions from the surroundings. It is an escapist-style behavior where people never give themselves a chance to confront themselves, their downsides, struggles and demons.
    Hence, they are continuously shielding themselves from uncomfortable feelings, living in the blue-pill matrix for years while postponing any kind of self-ramification that is so needed for personal development. Combine that with all of these instant gratification impulses where people never have the patience to plan ahead and see the reward in the future. They all want it now immediately and don't want to wait or put in the effort for that change they all want happening so badly.

    Keep in mind, that all big lifestyle changes to the better take time, effort, patience and perseverance where the big turnarounds might not be evident until a few years but people tend to think in terms of only a few days maximum and hence become disappointed when the desired changes don't occur right away.
     
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  15. ADN85

    ADN85 Fapstronaut

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    The answer is a clear “yes”.

    The better shape, the less stressed you will feel. There is a trap though, because if training becomes a huge priority, planning training could become a stress factor. This wont be the case with 20 minutes a day, which you could do at home or right outside your door. Do it in the morning for maximal effect.

    Meditation in the evening if you want even further stress reduction. Dont work out in the evening, as it can make it hard to fall asleep.
     
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  16. Anonymous86

    Anonymous86 Fapstronaut

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    I do a Meditation session now for at least 10-15 minutes daily.
     
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  17. VirilitySupreme1776

    VirilitySupreme1776 Fapstronaut

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    Depends... what's your diet like ? Figure out your macronutrient needs first, then fix your exercise routine.

    Any exercise will improve your life greatly, if you eat healthy after leaving the gym :)
     
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