Question yourself if your PMO addiction is linked to other habits as well.

Discussion in 'Self Improvement' started by Woodcutter74, Jul 16, 2019.

  1. Woodcutter74

    Woodcutter74 Fapstronaut

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    If you have a tendency to relapse often, question yourself if:
    1. Is it related to you spending too much time on social media?
    2. Is it triggered by bad eating habits and lack of exercise?
    3. Triggered by boredom, anxiety, procrastination, lack of confidence and self esteem?
    4. People you meet in real life?
    5. Forgetting an ex?
    6. Frustration of your love life?
    7. Lack of ambition, motivation to better yourself and life situation?
    There are probably more questions and habits as well, so feel free to add; but if you answered a few of these questions with a yes, then quitting porn is not the only solution, but it is a start. You also have to quit other bad habits while changing your mindset as well.....
     
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  2. WayIare

    WayIare Fapstronaut

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    I do it when I'm stressed. Not when I'm horny.
    I can't deal with stress at all. Im so tired and nervous all the time.
     
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  3. Awedouble

    Awedouble Fapstronaut

    If you're going to look at kind of the physics of it it's beyond habits people have but just repetitive cycles, and some are actually helpful for quitting the bad habits because some cyclic activity are built into nature - that's why some people even on this site work on their sleep/wake cycle.

    Not everything is social or psychological, but it may be cycle-logical. Viewed from this perspective, it isn't 'so much' a matter of spending "too much" time whether it's social media (which of course is a big one) or anything else, it is a lack of synchronization with natural cycles and being hooked on artificial/unnatural ones that are always on, and on-demand. The fact that there are hospitals and other architecture now installing circadian lighting systems, which relates to the sleep/wake cycle should tell us something.

    But more fundamentally, it is the difference between seeing time as a simplistic linear measurement of hours/days and seeing it as interlocking cycles in a networked interaction. The "interlocking" relationship actually supports the existence of the body itself because it's not just a sack of meat but a bunch of very intricate processes with its own cyclic activity, and when one part kind of goes on its own and run amok that's usually some form of disease.
     
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