Why 90 days?

Discussion in 'Porn Addiction' started by Archangel221, Jul 16, 2020.

Tags:
  1. StarRider

    StarRider Fapstronaut

    575
    590
    93
    When diagnoses disappear from medical manuals, there is always an agenda behind it:

    Ironically, at nearly the very same moment that sexual addiction began its technology generated escalation in the early 1990s, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) removed the term “sexual addiction” as a diagnostic indicator when publishing the DSM-IV (and later the DSM-IV-TR). Consequently, the past 25 years have wrought a rather anguished, aggressively argued, somewhat personality driven and inconsistent history in the attempts of the psychiatric, addiction, legal and mental health communities to accurately research, label and distinguish the problem of excessive adult consensual sexual behavior. During this period, potentially useful “clinical” diagnostic and treatment models with names such as “Sexual Addiction” (Carnes, 1983; 1991), “Sexual Compulsion” (Coleman, 1990; 2003), “Out-of-Control Sexual Behavior” (Kinsey Institute), and “Sexual Disorder NOS with Addictive Features” (DSM-II, 1968) have been used somewhat interchangeably among informed clinicians, 12-step communities and the general public. But in 2012, without a formal, universally accepted diagnosis, this language has about as much clinical credibility as do “Nymphomania” and “Don Juan-ism,” the terms used to describe similar issues over a century ago.

    The disorders don't disappear.
     
    Archangel221 likes this.
  2. StarRider

    StarRider Fapstronaut

    575
    590
    93
    Of related concern is the fact that the sex therapy, sex offender and sex addiction fields, all highly evolved specialties that should be working together with shared knowledge and support, are literally at an unresolved and definitive split over whether sexual addiction even exists! One current example is the recent book that spends 250 or so well-written pages implying that sexual addiction/sexual compulsion/hypersexuality is merely:

    a) a false clinical mirror for a repressive, sex negative and moralistic culture
    b) a fake diagnosis that uses repressive, moralistic judgments to make money, fame and fortune for savvy but unethical clinicians
    c) a backlash against healthy male sexuality
    d) an attempt to use a clinical term to reign in less culturally acceptable consensual sexual choices
    e) all of the above

    The fact that a book like this has garnered attention highlights the fact that the lack of a formal diagnosis has allowed sexual addiction to become an ongoing catalyst for professional disinformation, clinical acrimony and shared disrespect–all in an area of addiction and mental health care that is in great need of integrative, holistic treatment goals, policy, coordinated research and clinical direction.


    https://www.counselormagazine.com/en/article/sexual-addiction
     
    Archangel221 likes this.
  3. Where did you get this number from?
     
  4. ShaolinMonk

    ShaolinMonk Fapstronaut

    47
    25
    18
    "In human cocaine abusers, the reductions in D2 receptor concentrations persist into abstinence (Volkow et al., 1993). It is difficult to draw conclusions about the duration of this effect, however, since all of the participants had relapsed by the end of a few months. Furthermore, it is possible that lower D2 receptor concentrations may have predated drug use. In animal models where greater control over environmental and pharmacological variables can be exercised, Nader and colleagues have reported that D2 receptor availability following limited (less than a month) cocaine exposure in nonhuman primates, recovered to control levels after only 1–3 weeks. However, this was not the case when longer periods (12 months) of exposure to cocaine self-administration were investigated. Here, recovery was found in only 60% of the monkeys within 3 months, whereas in the other 40% there was no evidence of recovery even after as long as a year after the cessation of cocaine use. These data emphasize the significance of the exposure period prior to the discontinuation of drug use. It is likely that because of the relatively short periods of exposure used in many studies using animal models, the intensity and duration of many neuroadaptations may be underestimated."
     
  5. This is about cocaine. If you don't research in good faith, then don't research at all. Better to be ignorant than misinformed.
     
  6. ShaolinMonk

    ShaolinMonk Fapstronaut

    47
    25
    18
    Yeah it's about cocaine and? https://visual.ly/community/Infographics/health/porn-effects-dopamine-levels as we can see pornography doesn't increase as much dopamine as cocaine. So it's even easier to regenerate the dopamine receptors.
     
  7. That's an infographic with no sources other than the account who posted it. The account ("pornaddiction") is affiliated with a website called www.pornaddiction.com. Clearly a biased site. Found the infographic from their website: http://pornographyaddiction.com/porn-viewing-effects-on-dopamine-levels-infographic/. It's the same image, but also has no sources, links, or other resources. You left me with no way to fact check any of this data.
     
  8. ShaolinMonk

    ShaolinMonk Fapstronaut

    47
    25
    18
    Okay, there is no source. Do you know how dopamine work ? Stimulants such as amphetamine, and cocaine increase the levels of dopamine in the brain and can cause symptoms of psychosis, particularly after large doses or prolonged use. Okay.. so cocaine or amphetamine need to raise our dopamine levels very high to get these symptoms like psychosis. Do you get these effects with pornography or masturbation? maniac symptoms, psychosis, hallucination? NO. So pornography and masturbation cannot raise our dopamine as high as cocaine or metamphetamine.
     
  9. You ask a very important question. No, I absolutely do not know how dopamine works, and I don't think most people on this forum do. This is why it is essential to present reliable and verifiable information before drawing conclusions from faulty research, which causes people to have the wrong ideas about very complex issues. I receive a lot of shit for being skeptical of anti-porn rhetoric and research because I prioritize academic integrity very highly. Even if you are completely correct about what you are saying, you need to have robust evidence for it.
     
    ShaolinMonk likes this.
  10. me as exception
     
  11. fredisthebes

    fredisthebes Fapstronaut

    806
    990
    93
    Yeah, you'd be surprised. I used to spend hours reading about porn actresses, films and scenes theyd been in, and chatting about them on adult film forums. Not even sexual, but part of the same compulsion. Thats why i said every addiction is somewhat personal, so you have to figure out what works for you.
     
  12. Its just an estimated day count for one's brain to fully reboot. Although this varies from case to case, some people will take 90 days, some will take less, some will take more. It took me 180 to 200 days of being PMO free for a full reboot...
     
    Archangel221 and FellatiousD like this.
  13. Shuffledude88

    Shuffledude88 Fapstronaut

    A future totally free from porn should be the real mindset. It’s not just some fun challenge we are doing here for a few months. It’s about changing our lives and embracing our true self.
     
    Archangel221 and FellatiousD like this.

Share This Page